Who Can Help You – And Who Can You Help Win?

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It’s a lot easier to pursue your Passionate Purpose when you have someone on your side, encouragins you, helping you, and holding you accountable.

Greg, is this going to be a post about having an accountability partner? That’s an old, boring idea. Come on, man.

Hang on a second. You’re right that it’s an old idea, but here’s a question for you: Do you have an accountability partner who’s helping you achieve your most important goal right now?

Don’t feel bad, most of us don’t. We all know it’s a good idea, but most of us never follow through with it. Some of us start off with an accountability partner and then over a few weeks or months, we drift until the idea fades.

 

The times I have stuck with an accountability partner have paid huge dividends for me. I used one to get serious about working out and I used one to write my first book. Anytime I felt like skipping a workout, or not working on my book, I knew I would have to answer to my partner. I also knew I’d be letting him down.

That pushed me and kept me going. Better yet, the encouragement I got from my partner for all my hard work really inspired me.

I even discovered something super cool about having an accountability partner. When you help someone else achieve their goals, that helps you, too. It makes you feel great, and it gives you extra energy and incentive to keep going after what you really want.

Ok, Greg, you’ve sold me. So, how do I get – and keep – a partner? And how do we hold each other accountable in an encouraging way?

First, you need to get 100% clear on exactly what you want and why you want it.

Write that down.

When will you do “x” by?

How will you know you’ve done it?

Write that down.

Who will you choose as your accountability partner? It should be someone who shares your desire for an extraordinary life, someone who will support you in your efforts and kick you in the butt when you need it.

Be careful not to get someone who really doesn’t think you’re going to achieve your goal. I know that sounds ridiculous, but I’ve seen people set themselves up for failure that way.

Search for someone you look up to, who has a reputation for doing what he says, and for following through.

I find the best accountability partners are people who want you to hold them accountable for goals they’re working on in their life as well. When you encourage each other and hold each other accountable, great things happen.

If you can find someone who has a goal very similar to yours, that’s even better. I have found that it’s often better to find someone who isn’t a family member or a super close friend. Sometimes, when we’re that close, we don’t feel comfortable pushing each other.

Is there someone in your circle of friends at church, work, or in the neighborhood you would feel comfortable working with?

Action Steps:

  • Get an accountability partner today or tomorrow. Don’t wait.
  • Schedule a time once a week for an accountability phone call and half way through the week exchange an accountability email.

The content of the call and the email is simple. Ask each other:

  • What did you say you would do this week?
  • What work have you done on that?
  • What adjustments do you need to make to improve your progress?
  • What can I do to help you?

Remember:

  • Encourage each other
  • Celebrate mini successes
  • Remind each other how far you’ve come
  • Support each other on the “why” behind your goals.

Let’s GO!

I now offer one to one coaching and an online coaching program. Click here for more details.

How Trying to Show How Smart I (think) I Am Hurt Me

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We all want to connect with people, right? We want to form good relationships in and out of the workplace. We want to be respected. We want people to know how smart and great we are!

Okay, Greg, you lost me on that last one.

Did I? Maybe it’s just me. Sometimes I notice that I have an unhealthy desire to make sure the people I’m dealing with know I’m smart, accomplished, successful…(Geez, just writing this out makes me feel like a jerk.) What adds insult to injury is that when I do this, it doesn’t help me it hurts me. It also hurts the person I’m trying to show up. So, why do I do it?

I rationalize that I mainly fall into this trap when the person I’m dealing with is putting out signals that he thinks he’s better than me. To which I brilliantly respond by thinking, “He thinks he’s better than me? Who does he think he is? I’ll show him!”

Yes, brilliant. That will get him to like me/buy from me/want to do business with me.

Wrong.

This kind of thing just happened the other day. I told myself a story that the guy I was talking with was acting like he was way better than me. So, I started talking, and talking, and talking to prove how much I knew, how smart I was, why he should listen to me, blah, blah, blah.

Then I realized what I was doing. I physically felt ill at my actions. So, I stopped. I apologized for dominating the conversation and started asking him questions. I learned a lot and actually started a friendship.

How many times do we tear down the relationships and influence we are trying to build with the need to make sure the other guy knows we’re pretty cool stuff?

We can fall into this trap with our bosses, the people we manage, our children, our spouses, our preachers…

What helps me with this is being secure in who I am, yet working at remaining humble. I remember that we are all equal in God’s eyes, that everyone knows something I don’t know, and that I will learn more and make more friends by asking questions and listening than by trying to show off.

“Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it’s thinking of yourself less.”
-C. S. Lewis

I also remember what my dad used to tell me, “Some people are thought to be fools. Others open their mouths and prove it.”

If this post resonated with you, Please subscribe to my blog and get my free eBook — 5 Steps to Finding Your Passionate Purpose.

How to Really Use LinkedIn – Not Just To Get A Job

Podcast interview included

social media

With all the social media sites out there it’s hard to keep up with them all. The big question is, which sites should you spend your valuable time on that will actually give you a great return on that investment?

One outlet that has the ability to really help your career and your business is LinkedIn.

I used to think it was just a way to put your resume online when you needed a job. It has changed greatly over the years.

It is now a site that can help you connect with potential customers, partners, entrepreneurs, employees, and more. Used correctly, it can help you grow your brand, establish you as an expert in your field, and help you sell your service or product.

My friend, Mike Montague, co-wrote a new book on how to best use LinkedIn. He covers:

  • How to build a winning profile that attracts great connections
  • How to decide who to connect with
  • How often to post on LinkedIn
  • How to prospect for clients
  • How to avoid common LinkedIn mistakes

You can get the ebook in PDF format for free here.

You can listen to my interview with Mike here:

You Have the Power to Increase Your “Luck”

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That guy is so lucky. Why can’t I have that kind of luck?

You can, if you work at it.

Greg, I think you’re missing the point of what luck is. You don’t work at it, you either have it or you don’t.

Wrong. I don’t believe in luck the way most people define it. I think “luck” happens to people who work hard and look for opportunities.

“Diligence is the mother of good luck.”

–Benjamin Franklin

Professor Richard Wiseman did extensive research on this in his book, The Luck Factor. He discovered four common principles among his subjects on becoming “lucky.”

1) Maximize Chance Opportunities: LPs (lucky people) are open to what some people call chance opportunities or coincidences or serendipity. They look for them and act upon them. They’re also open to new ideas and experiences.

2) Listen to Lucky Hunches: LPs pay attention to that little voice inside them. They go with their gut.

3) Expect Good Fortune: LPs have a strong belief that things are going to work out for them. They always expect the best. This helps them create the future they want. LPs keep going in bad times because of their belief that good things are coming. It also helps them relate well with others. This helps them network and creates even more opportunities for them.

4) Turn Bad Luck to Good: Finally, when bad things happen to LPs they don’t think about them the same way unlucky people do. Instead, they truly look on the bright side. “It’s not that bad.” “It could have been worse.” “I can learn something from this.” “Here’s how I can fix it.” This allows LPs to quickly get back in the good-luck groove.

Lucky people build a strong “network of luck.” Your chances of meeting the right person increase with the number of people you engage with every day. Just like you will never be lucky enough to win the lottery if you never buy a ticket, you will never have that “lucky” encounter if you don’t bother to meet and engage with people on a daily basis.

If you truly enjoy meeting people and talking with strangers whenever the opportunity arises, you will become much luckier.

This really paid off for my wife and me when we were getting ready to put our house on the market for a big move to Dallas. We had only bought the home a year earlier and we knew by the time we paid the realtor we were going to lose money on the deal.

I had a radio fundraiser that week at a children’s hospital. I talked to all the people manning the phones and had a great morning getting to know everyone.

A couple weeks later my wife and I were on our nightly walk in our neighborhood and I saw one of the guys I met at the fund raiser driving by. I waved him down, talked with him, and learned he was looking to buy a house in the area.

I explained we were getting ready to sell, but hadn’t put it on the market yet. I invited him by to look at our home. It was perfect for his family and he asked me how much I wanted for it. I told him we had only bought it a year ago and just wanted to break even on it.

He said he would feel bad if I didn’t make something on it and offered me a couple grand more than I asked for!

Has this kind of thing ever happened to you? Was it luck, or was it an opportunity you created without even realizing it? When something that good happens I also like to think of it as a God wink, but God helps those who help themselves.